Drones and the entire unmanned industry is a rapidly evolving field, with a specialized vocabulary.  So, we’re covering one term per week to help you get (or stay!) up to speed!

Autonomous Flight – Drone Term of the Week

What is an autonomous flight?

Aren’t all drones autonomous?  Well, no.

Some UAVs are controlled not by a human sending radio signals but by internal programming that tells it where to fly. For example, a UAV may use its on-board GPS system to fly from one predetermined point to another.

We offer certification courses so that you can operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Join us!

The Drone Term of the Week – Do You Know Them All?

By |2020-02-20T00:40:01+00:00February 20th, 2020|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

TFR – Drone Term of the Week

What is a TFR?

And why does a drone pilot care?

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is a type of Notices to Airmen (NOTAM). A TFR defines an area restricted to air travel due to a hazardous condition, a special event, or a general warning for the entire FAA airspace. The text of the actual TFR contains the fine points of the restriction.

More from the FAA

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The Drone Term of the Week – Do You Know Them All?

By |2020-01-23T20:51:08+00:00February 5th, 2020|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Waiver – Drone Term of the Week

What is a waiver?

Who do you get it from, and under what circumstances are they issued?

A waiver is an official document issued by the FAA which approves certain operations of aircraft outside the limitations of a regulation.

You may request to fly specific drone operations not allowed under part 107 by requesting an operational waiver. These waivers allow drone pilots to deviate from certain rules under part 107 by demonstrating they can still fly safely using alternative methods.
Drone Operations that Require Waivers

You do NOT need a waiver to fly a drone following part 107 rules. You DO need a waiver when you want to operate a drone contrary to the rules in part 107 under the waivable operations listed below:

We offer certification courses so that you can operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Join us!

The Drone Term of the Week – Do You Know Them All?

By |2020-01-23T20:36:25+00:00January 28th, 2020|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

AGL – Drone Term of the Week

What does AGL mean?

And what does it have to do with drones & UAVs?

AGL means “above ground level.” Drones and UAVs are allowed to fly up to 400′ AGL, or up to 400 feet above the ground.
They can also fly within 400 feet of any structure, regardless of the structure’s height above the ground.

We offer certification courses so that you can operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Join us!

https://techcenterguam.com/guam-uav-academy/

The Drone Term of the Week – Do You Know Them All?

By |2020-01-23T20:31:33+00:00January 23rd, 2020|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Brushless Motors – Drone Term of the Week

What is a Brushless Motor?

And what does it have to do with drones & UAVs?

These motors have permanent magnets that rotate around an armature.

This eliminates any problems with connected current and moving parts.

Brushless motors are much more efficient and hardy than brushed motors.

We offer certification courses so that you can operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Join us!

The Drone Term of the Week – Do You Know Them All?

By |2020-01-17T22:11:10+00:00January 13th, 2020|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Part 107- Drone Term of the Week

What is this mysterious Part 107, and what does it have to do with drones?

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rules for small unmanned aircraft (UAS) operations other than model aircraft – Part 107 of FAA regulations – cover a broad spectrum of commercial and government uses for drones weighing less than 55 pounds.

From the FAA Part 107 Fact Sheet (click here to check for updates!)

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rules for small unmanned aircraft (UAS) operations other than model aircraft – Part 107 of FAA regulations – cover a broad spectrum of commercial and government uses for drones weighing less than 55 pounds. Here are the highlights of the rule.

Operating Requirements
When you are manipulating the controls of a drone, always avoid manned aircraft and never operate in a careless or reckless manner. You must keep your drone within sight. Alternatively, if you use First Person View or similar technology, you must have a visual observer always keep your aircraft within unaided sight (for example, no binoculars). Neither you nor a visual observer can be responsible for more than one unmanned aircraft operation at a time.

You can fly during daylight (30 minutes before official sunrise to 30 minutes after official sunset, local time) or in twilight with appropriate anti-collision lighting. Minimum weather visibility is three miles from your control station. The maximum allowable altitude is 400 feet above the ground, higher if your drone remains within 400 feet of a structure. Maximum speed is 100 mph (87 knots).

You currently cannot fly a small UAS over anyone not directly participating in the operation, not under a covered structure, or not inside a covered stationary vehicle.  No operations from a moving vehicle are allowed unless you are flying over a sparsely populated area.

You can carry an external load if it is securely attached and does not adversely affect the flight characteristics or controllability of the aircraft. You also may transport property for compensation or hire within state boundaries provided the drone, including its attached systems, payload and cargo, weighs less than 55 pounds total and you obey the other flight rules. (Some exceptions apply to Hawaii and the District of Columbia.)

You can request a waiver of most restrictions if you can show your operation will provide a level of safety at least equivalent to the restriction from which you want the waiver.

Registration
Anyone flying under Part 107 has to register each drone they intend to operate. If your drone weighs less than 55 lbs., you can use the automated registration system.

Pilot Certification
To operate the controls of a small UAS under Part 107, you need a remote pilot certificate with a small UAS rating, or be under the direct supervision of a person who holds such a certificate

You must be at least 16 years old to qualify for a remote pilot certificate, and you can obtain it in one of two ways.

  • You may pass an initial aeronautical knowledge test at an FAA-approved knowledge testing center.
  • If you already have a Part 61 pilot certificate, you must have completed a flight review in the previous 24 months and you must take a small UAS online training course provided by the FAA.

If you have a Part 61 certificate, you will immediately receive a temporary remote pilot certificate when you apply for a permanent certificate. Other applicants will obtain a temporary remote pilot certificate upon successful completion of TSA security vetting. We anticipate we will be able to issue temporary certificates within 10 business days after receiving a completed application.

UAS Certification
You are responsible for ensuring a drone is safe before flying, but the FAA does not require small UAS to comply with current agency airworthiness standards or obtain aircraft certification. For example, you will have to perform a preflight inspection that includes checking the communications link between the control station and the UAS.

Other Requirements
If you are acting as pilot in command, you have to comply with several other provisions of the rule:

  • You must make your drone available to the FAA for inspection or testing on request, and you must provide any associated records required to be kept under the rule.
  • You must report any operation that results in serious injury, loss of consciousness, or property damage of at least $500.to the FAA within 10 days

Waivers and Airspace Authorizations
The FAA can issue waivers to certain requirements of Part 107 if an operator demonstrates they can fly safely under the waiver without endangering other aircraft or people and property on the ground or in the air. Operations in Class G airspace are allowed without air traffic control permission. Operations in Class B, C, D and E airspace need ATC approval.

In November 2017, the FAA deployed the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC – pronounced “LANCE”) for drone operators at several air traffic facilities in an evaluation to see how well the prototype system functions and to address any issues that arise during testing. A beta test expansion of the system began on April 30, 2018 to deploy LAANC incrementally at nearly 300 air traffic facilities covering approximately 500 airports. The final deployment will begin on September 13.

The FAA expects LAANC will ultimately provide near real-time processing of airspace authorization requests for drone operators nationwide. The system is designed to automatically approve most requests to operate in specific areas of airspace below designated altitudes.

The Drone Term of the Week – Do You Know Them All?

By |2020-01-17T22:11:42+00:00December 27th, 2019|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Stabilization – Drone Term of the Week

Drones are unstable by nature – and they’re always in motion!

So, stability is a very important thing!

In this Term of the Week, we discuss some of the ways that drones (quad copters, octocopters, and other drone types) can be stabilized!

Using a Computer

By now, you’ve surely noticed that every movement is accomplished by changing the spin rate of one or more rotors. Doing that simply requires a controller that can increase or decrease the voltage to each motor. That’s not too difficult to set up. But just imagine this—you have a drone with 4 controllers. You’d need one controller for each motor power level. It would be crazy difficult to manually adjust each motor power to achieve the desired motion.

However, if you have some type of computer control system, you can simply push a joystick with your thumb and let a computer handle all of that. An accelerometer and gyroscope in the drone can further increase the ease and stability of flight by making minute adjustments in the power to each rotor.
https://www.wired.com/2017/05/the-physics-of-drones/

The Drone Term of the Week – Do You Know Them All?

By |2019-12-17T00:26:14+00:00December 17th, 2019|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

IMU – Drone Term of the Week – Inertial Measurement Unit

An IMU is an Inertial measurement Measurement Unit.

This is a construction of accelerometers and gyros to measure complex movements.  IMUs are used on uavs and drones, but also fitness trackers, smart phones and even high end bicycles!

Why an IMU?  Why not just use gyros or accelerometers?

An IMU has at least three accelerometers (measuring the gravity vector in the x, ,y and z dimensions) and two gyros (measuring rotation around the tilt and pitch axis).

Each of these devices is required to correct for the others.

Accelerometers are thrown off by movement (ie, they are ““noisy”” over short periods of time), while gyros drift over time. An IMU assembly keeps all of these items functioning properly.

The data from both types of sensors must be combined in software to determine true aircraft attitude and movement.

See this explainer  video as well.

One technique for doing this is the Kalman filter.

The Drone Term of the Week – Do You Know Them All?

By |2019-12-07T22:26:57+00:00December 7th, 2019|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Drone Term of the Week – Arduino

What’s an Arduino?

An open source embedded processor project. Includes a hardware standard originally based on the Atmel Atmega (and other 8-bit) microprocessor microcontroller and necessary supporting hardware, and a software programming environment based on the C-like Processing language.

Includes a hardware standard originally based on the Atmel Atmega (and other 8-bit) microprocessor microcontroller and necessary supporting hardware, and a software programming environment based on the C-like processing language.

Arduino

From Sparkfun

Arduino is an open-source platform used for building electronics projects. Arduino consists of both a physical programmable circuit board (often referred to as a microcontroller) and a piece of software, or IDE (Integrated Development Environment) that runs on your computer, used to write and upload computer code to the physical board.

The Arduino platform has become quite popular with people just starting out with electronics, and for good reason. Unlike most previous programmable circuit boards, the Arduino does not need a separate piece of hardware (called a programmer) in order to load new code onto the board — you can simply use a USB cable. Additionally, the Arduino IDE uses a simplified version of C++, making it easier to learn to program. Finally, Arduino provides a standard form factor that breaks out the functions of the micro-controller into a more accessible package.

More Drone Terms – Do You Know Them All?

  • autonomous flight
  • Drone Term of the Week - TFR
  • Drone Word of the Week - Waiver
  • Drone Word of the Week - AGL
  • Drone Term of the Week - Brushless Motor
  • Tech Center Term of the Week Part 107
  • Stabilization - Drone Term of the Week
  • IMU - Inertial Measurement Unit
  • arduino
  • 2.4 Ghz
  • FOV
  • Drone term of the week - Gimbal
  • drone term of the week - fc or flight controller
  • drone term of the week - Collision Avoidance
  • Drone Term of the Week - IP Rating
  • Drone Term of the week - COA
By |2019-12-02T15:47:40+00:00December 2nd, 2019|Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Drone Term of the Week – 2.4 Ghz

What’s 2.4 Ghz?

2.4 Ghz: The frequency used by digital (spread spectrum) radio communications in our applications, including 2.4Ghz RC, bluetooth and some video transmission equipment. This is a different band than the older 72 Mhz band that is used for analog RC communications. To avoid radio frequency conflict is it often a good idea to use 72 Mhz radio equipment when you are using 2.4 Ghz onboard video transmitters, or use 900 Mhz video when using 2.4 Ghz RC equipment.

The frequency range from 2.4 to 2.4835 GHz, which is unlicensed and used for many communications applications, including Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. Microwave ovens also use this frequency. See 5 GHz band, ISM band, Bluetooth and 802.11.

On the impact of inter-UAV communications interference in the 2.4 GHz band

IEEE

As the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) increases, protocols to avoid collisions between them, and to achieve collaboration through swarm-based configurations, are receiving more attention by the research community. In this work we study the performance of communication links between drones in the 2.4 GHz wireless band, where a high interference from the radio control unit is expected. We performed a large set of experimental tests, and the results demonstrate that the use of the WiFi 2.4 GHz band for any application is not compatible with overwhelming majority of remote controls working in the same frequency band. Moreover, the distance between drones, the data packet size, and the engines speed are also factors affecting the communications link quality.

More Drone Terms – Do You Know Them All?

  • autonomous flight
  • Drone Term of the Week - TFR
  • Drone Word of the Week - Waiver
  • Drone Word of the Week - AGL
  • Drone Term of the Week - Brushless Motor
  • Tech Center Term of the Week Part 107
  • Stabilization - Drone Term of the Week
  • IMU - Inertial Measurement Unit
  • arduino
  • 2.4 Ghz
  • FOV
  • Drone term of the week - Gimbal
  • drone term of the week - fc or flight controller
  • drone term of the week - Collision Avoidance
  • Drone Term of the Week - IP Rating
  • Drone Term of the week - COA
By |2019-11-13T00:22:03+00:00November 24th, 2019|Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Drone Term of the Week – Field of View – FOV

What’s an FOV?

Frequently mentioned in the context of video games and drones – The field of view (FoV) is the extent of the observable world that is seen at any given moment. In the case of optical instruments or sensors it is a solid angle through which a detector is sensitive to electromagnetic radiation.

FOV refers to the measurement of how much of the environment you can see through a camera lens, usually measured in degrees.

The Field of View depends on the camera equipment AND the type of mount, such as a gimbal that may extend the field of view.

FOV Diagram

The neuromorphic bug eye cam: A 180-degree visual system for drones

From Extreme Tech

Autonomous surveillance drones are basically cameras with wings. While high-resolution cameras focused on the ground might need to be optimized for contrast sensitivity and feature extraction, those that look around the sky need a wide FOV with good resolution. A new device known as the Curvace (Curved Artificial Compound Eye) has recently been developed to meet these kinds of demands. It is not so much a camera as it a complete visual system.

The vertebrate eye, such as your own, depends on a complex control system to bring its full resolving power to bear. Synchronizing the movement of the eye, not only with head movements and body movements, but with body motion, and the movements of the eye’s binocular partner, while tracking a moving object is not just difficult — it is for all practical purposes, a digital impossibility. For these reasons, the multi-lensed eye of the invertebrate is increasingly seen as an attractive solution to the basic problem of limited field of view.

More Drone Terms – Do You Know Them All?

  • autonomous flight
  • Drone Term of the Week - TFR
  • Drone Word of the Week - Waiver
  • Drone Word of the Week - AGL
  • Drone Term of the Week - Brushless Motor
  • Tech Center Term of the Week Part 107
  • Stabilization - Drone Term of the Week
  • IMU - Inertial Measurement Unit
  • arduino
  • 2.4 Ghz
  • FOV
  • Drone term of the week - Gimbal
  • drone term of the week - fc or flight controller
  • drone term of the week - Collision Avoidance
  • Drone Term of the Week - IP Rating
  • Drone Term of the week - COA
By |2019-11-13T00:24:15+00:00November 18th, 2019|Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Drone Term of the Week – Gimbal

What is a gimbal?

It’s not just the camera that provides the field of vision that allows a drone operator to “see” those grand sweeping vistas. A special mount called a gimbal provides the freedom of motion for a drone to “look” in different directions.

Many UAVs use a gimbal system to mount cameras or other equipment for flexible maneuvering.

Different designs can move on two or three axes.

Drone term of the week - Gimbal

How Does A Gimbal Work?

From EVO Gimbals

The 3 axis gimbal stabilizes the tilt, pan, and roll of a camera. So if you move side to side, up and down, back and forth, the mount stabilizes the video even if you are shaky.

The Tilt
Tilting is moving up and down. This feature of a camera stabilizer is used to take a video of an object moving up and down or vice versa. Taking a video of a person going down and up the stairs or an object falling to the ground are good examples of the tilt axis.

The Pan
Panning is moving from left to right and vice versa. This feature of the gimbal is used when following an object moving horizontally.

The Roll
The roll is a good feature to use when somebody is moving back and forth. If you are to take a video of the sunset and you will be moving back and forth, you’d want your video to focus on the same area where the sunset is even if you have to move forward or backward.

Enjoy this video explainer from TechQuickie –

The Tech Center has drone certification courses to help you operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Check out our drone courses here!

More Drone Terms – Do You Know Them All?

  • autonomous flight
  • Drone Term of the Week - TFR
  • Drone Word of the Week - Waiver
  • Drone Word of the Week - AGL
  • Drone Term of the Week - Brushless Motor
  • Tech Center Term of the Week Part 107
  • Stabilization - Drone Term of the Week
  • IMU - Inertial Measurement Unit
  • arduino
  • 2.4 Ghz
  • FOV
  • Drone term of the week - Gimbal
  • drone term of the week - fc or flight controller
  • drone term of the week - Collision Avoidance
  • Drone Term of the Week - IP Rating
  • Drone Term of the week - COA
By |2019-11-11T23:52:13+00:00November 11th, 2019|Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Drone Term of the Week -Collision Avoidance

Does a drone have a brain?

Drone Term of the Week – FC – Flight Controller

A FPV Drone Flight Controller, or FC, is the “brain” of a UAV and controls most onboard electrical components with the assistance on an arduino-like microprocessor and is connected to a number of sensors.

Flight controllers are continuously evolving with their processors becoming faster to keep up with evolving flight controller softwares. Flight controllers are usually titled to include the main microprocessor’s (usually an STM electronics, 32-bit microprocessor) model as this gives the pilot a basic idea of the flight controllers capabilities. The most common microprocessor models used are the STM32 F1, F3, F4 and F7 chips. Essentially, the higher the number after the ‘F’, the faster the microprocessor will be and the more functionality it will have. For any pilot purchasing a flight controller, it is currently recommended to purchase one with an F4 or F7 processor as they are easily fast enough to run the latest FC firmwares. Unfortunately, the F1 is becoming too slow to run the latest FC firmwares and is not recommended to purchase as it will soon become unsupported. F3 boards can currently run the latest flight controller firmwares although the microprocessor is consequently slower than an F4 to F7 at reading and responding to sensor inputs. This reading and response time is respectively known as the gyro update frequency and the PID loop frequency.

From FPV Drone Flight Controller Processors

In this video, @painless360 describes various types of Opensource flight controllers and why you might choose one over another.

The Tech Center has drone certification courses to help you operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Check out our drone courses here!

More Drone Terms – Do You Know Them All?

By |2019-10-27T21:54:17+00:00November 2nd, 2019|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Drone Term of the Week -Collision Avoidance

How do drones sense and avoid other drones and objects?

Drone Term of the Week – Collision Avoidance

Most UAVs have collision avoidance systems to prevent pilots from flying into fixed objects or other aircraft. It is also known as sense and avoid.

This paper has an excellent discussion with diagrams illustrating some of the options drones can use to sense and avoid objects.

This paper demonstrates an innovative and simple solution for obstacle detection and collision avoidance of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) optimized for and evaluated with quadrotors. The sensors exploited in this paper are low-cost ultrasonic and infrared range finders, which are much cheaper though noisier than more expensive sensors such as laser scanners. This needs to be taken into consideration for the design, implementation, and parametrization of the signal processing and control algorithm for such a system, which is the topic of this paper. For improved data fusion, inertial and optical flow sensors are used as a distance derivative for reference. As a result, a UAV is capable of distance controlled collision avoidance, which is more complex and powerful than comparable simple solutions. At the same time, the solution remains simple with a low computational burden. Thus, memory and time-consuming simultaneous localization and mapping is not required for collision avoidance.

from Obstacle Detection and Collision Avoidance for a UAV With Complementary Low-Cost Sensors

Watch this 47-second video from the NASA Armstrong Research Center that illustrates collision avoidance –

The Tech Center has drone certification courses to help you operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Check out our drone courses here!

More Drone Terms – Do You Know Them All?

By |2019-10-27T21:20:39+00:00October 27th, 2019|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Drone Term of the Week – IMU

Drone Term of the Week – IMU –

IMU is an acronym.   An IMU is an inertial measurement unit is an electronic device that measures and reports a body’s specific force, angular rate, and sometimes orientation of the body.

IMU uses a combination of accelerometers, gyroscopes and sometimes magnetometers.

An IMU is a specific type of sensor that measures angular rate, force and sometimes magnetic field. IMUs are composed of a 3-axis accelerometer and a 3-axis gyroscope, which would be considered a 6-axis IMU. They can also include an additional 3-axis magnetometer, which would be considered a 9-axis IMU. Technically, the term “IMU” refers to just the sensor, but IMUs are often paired with sensor fusion software which combines data from multiple sensors to provide measures of orientation and heading. In common usage, the term “IMU” may be used to refer to the combination of the sensor and sensor fusion software; this combination is also referred to as an AHRS (Attitude Heading Reference System).

from What is an IMU Sensor?

The Tech Center has drone certification courses to help you operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Check out our drone courses here!

More Drone Terms – Do You Know Them All?

By |2019-10-20T23:39:54+00:00October 20th, 2019|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Drone Term of the Week – IP Rating

Drone Term of the Week – IP Rating

A system that classifies the degree of protection that an electrical enclosure has against water and dust.

 

The IP Rating depends on the protection provided by mechanical casings and electrical enclosures.

The code includes two digits – the first shows the level of protection against solids, the second shows the level of protection against liquids.

Drone Term of the Week - IP Rating

In this example, this drone has an IP rating of 65, which indicates that it’s dust-tight, and protects against water jets from any angle.

Drone Term of the Week - IP Rating

The Tech Center has drone certification courses to help you operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Check out our drone courses here!

By |2019-10-20T23:55:41+00:00October 13th, 2019|Drone News, Drone term of the week|2 Comments

Drone Term of the Week – EMI

EMI – Electromagnetic Interference

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Any disturbance that could potentially affect the control of a UAV is known as EMI.

Interference can make it impossible for a human to pilot the drone from the ground.

All kinds of electromagnetic radiation could interfere with the piloting of UAVs.

And it impacts more than just drones – it also impacts aircraft electronics!

Electromagnetic interference (EMI) can cause avionic equipment performance to degrade or even malfunction. Interference can affect cockpit radios and radar signals, interfering with communication between pilot and control tower. Airborne devices that can cause interference include laptop computers, electronic games, cell phones, and electronic toys, and all have been suspected of causing events such as autopilot disconnects, erratic flight deck indications, and airplanes turning off course. Effects from lightning, solar flares, electrostatic discharge, and high-intensity radiated fields (HIRF) from radar and various kinds of transmitters or communications equipment – have all resulted in numerous aviation incidents throughout the years. As a result,  these effects are now considered in all aspects of avionics design and certification.

New digital flight control systems need to be hardened to all of these EMI effects. Standards such as RTCA DO-160 for environmental conditions and test procedures for airborne equipment or the Defense Department’s MIL-STD-461 exist to control EMI issues. These standards limit unnecessary electronic emissions.

One major way to combat EMI is to provide shielding of various line replaceable units (LRUs) and harnesses. Shielding a device or system not only reduces EMI emissions, it improves susceptibility performance. With advances in wireless technology and increased device signal sensitivity, shielding becomes even more important to maintain the functionality and safety of avionic equipment.

Controlling the EMI effects of aircraft avionics

The Tech Center has drone certification courses to help you operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Check out our drone courses here!

How’s Your Drone Vocabulary?  Check out these other Drone Terms.

  • autonomous flight
  • Drone Term of the Week - TFR
  • Drone Word of the Week - Waiver
  • Drone Word of the Week - AGL
  • Drone Term of the Week - Brushless Motor
  • Tech Center Term of the Week Part 107
By |2019-10-21T00:06:48+00:00October 7th, 2019|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Tech Center Term of the Week – COA

COA – Certificates of Authorization

Short for “Certificates of Authorization,” which are approvals to fly UAVs domestically granted by the FAA under existing rules. More than 100 have been issued to companies, universities, and government agencies. Among the first were Cornell University and the 174th Air National Guard Unit at Syracuse. We offer certification courses so that you can operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation.

Join us at the UAV Academy to earn your drone pilot license! 

How well do you know your drone terms? Check out our UAV Glossary!

  • autonomous flight
  • Drone Term of the Week - TFR
  • Drone Word of the Week - Waiver
  • Drone Word of the Week - AGL
  • Drone Term of the Week - Brushless Motor
  • Tech Center Term of the Week Part 107
By |2019-10-21T00:12:44+00:00September 30th, 2019|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments

Tech Center Term of the Week – BVLOS

UAV Term of the Week – BVLOS

BVLOS is an acronym for Beyond Visual Line of Sight

Pronounced “Bee-vee-loss”

The ability to operate an unmanned aircraft beyond the pilot’s line of sight.

Flying beyond the visual line of sight requires a special permit from the FAA.

The Tech Center offers certification courses so that you can operate your drone legally for work or recreation.

In recent news,

Iris Automation, a Silicon Valley-based startup, has been working on an onboard collision avoidance system that — for the first time — will power an FAA-sanctioned flight beyond an operator’s visual line of sight (BVLOS) without assistance from visual observers (VOs) or expensive ground-based radar systems.

Currently, almost all drone operations sanctioned by the FAA are prohibited from BVLOS operations, and the few counterexamples require either VOs or radar — both of which are prohibitive to conducting scalable, cost-effective operations such as pipeline inspection, drone delivery or urban air mobility.

Iris to Test Commercial Drone Sense and Avoid System in BVLOS First

The Tech Center has drone certification courses to help you operate your UAV or drone legally for work or recreation. Check out our drone courses here!

Do you know all these Drone Terms?

  • autonomous flight
  • Drone Term of the Week - TFR
  • Drone Word of the Week - Waiver
  • Drone Word of the Week - AGL
  • Drone Term of the Week - Brushless Motor
  • Tech Center Term of the Week Part 107
  • Stabilization - Drone Term of the Week
  • IMU - Inertial Measurement Unit
  • arduino
  • 2.4 Ghz
  • FOV
  • Drone term of the week - Gimbal
  • drone term of the week - fc or flight controller
  • drone term of the week - Collision Avoidance
  • Drone Term of the Week - IP Rating
  • Drone Term of the week - COA
By |2019-10-21T00:16:10+00:00September 21st, 2019|Drone News, Drone term of the week|0 Comments